My 5 fave books on the fur trade

My 5 fave books on the fur trade

Q: Where do you get accurate information? (Or do you just make this up?) Q: How do you know it’s true? I’m always on the lookout for new info. During the pandemic, I attended Zoom seminars, like on how voyageur sashes were made (George Washington wore one...
Meet Postmaster Gregoire

Meet Postmaster Gregoire

Meet “Postmaster Gregoire” who worked at Heritage Park Historical Village in Calgary, Alberta. The person inside that authentic outfit is fur trade historian, public speaker, interpreter and re-enactor Greg Ingram. He spent his summers and falls interpreting at the...
Eat like a voyageur — pea soup (Yum?)

Eat like a voyageur — pea soup (Yum?)

What voyageurs ate depended mostly on where they were — along the rivers, in the Great Lakes, at their wintering post or back home.  In the earliest days, Radisson, Champlain, Pond and other French-Canadian explorers and adventurers hunted and fished — and traded with...
Did fur traders make money on blankets?

Did fur traders make money on blankets?

My question exactly. How do you figure it out? Or, backing up a bit: What goods were profitable? Early on, fur traders discovered they needed more consumable goods — clothing, blankets, other fabrics, vermilion and beads, powder and shot, tobacco and alcohol. Fabrics...

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