Another taste of tourtière

Because my family event required 14 servings, I needed a second tourtière. After reading recipes, I chose one with other ingredients and a different thickening. This one called for onions, spiced with allspice. And potatoes, which really pumped up the filling! The meat filling was simmered for 2 hours. S we could do a taste test, I marked it with a tree (but we devoured it too quickly). This recipe came from the Je Me Souviens—La Cuisine De La Grandmère cookbook (published by the American-French Genealogical Society in Woonsocket, Rhode Island). A member of our local French-Canadian society kindly purchased it and sent it my way. The Je Me Souviens cookbook also included recipes for blood sausage, which—guess what?—happens to be a favorite food of Pretty Mouse, another of the book’s characters. (As interesting as blood sausage might be to read about, I don’t plan on testing that recipe. Reading about it will have to...
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What is André’s favorite food?

Tourtière is a French-Canadian meat pie made with ground pork and fragrant spices and often served at holiday times. This is important because tourtière is André‘s favorite food (André being the main character of “Waters Like the Sky.”) Each family has individualized the recipe, varying the spices, including other ingredients, like potatoes and onions, and using different methods (like simmering the meat from 15 minutes to 2 hours). I found this out when I casually asked about THE recipe. My French-Canadian cousin Joelle sent the cookbook from St. Genevieve’s Parish in Centerville, Minnesota. Her family’s special version was clipped to the pages with traditional foods. I could almost taste it. For a recent family occasion, I made her recipe. I’ve always wondered what held the crumbles of ground pork together—Joelle used bread crumbs, a delicious choice. And her spicing—cinnamon and cloves—was perfect. I marked the crust “N” (for “no onion”) which my brother and nephew particularly appreciated. Yum!...
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#8 voyageur statue: Pine City

The statue in Pine City, Minnesota, shows Ojibwe heritage, with straight hair and no beard, deep-set eyes, strong jaw and lack of beard. He’s wearing a knitted cap with a tassel, a simple voyageur shirt, sashed, and his trousers are tied with double cords at the knee (like my costume when I present programs). A voyageur’s tuque and sash complete his apparel. His moccasins have an amazing woodland flower pattern carved in, like they were beaded moccasins. His hair is almost to his shoulders and is blunt-cut. His narrow-bladed paddle that reaches past his shoulders suggests he was a steersmen, the avant or gouvernail, and a position of great responsibility. His mood is introspective — as if measuring the cost of the fur trade against his tribe and band — what will the world bring to them and how will they survive? He looks out at the river and community beyond, having led traders there. Maybe he’s wondering how now to best help his tribe. He stands on a base with the North West Company logo and motto “Perseverance.” This statue is another giant, at 35 feet, created in 1992 by Dennis Roghair, a local chainsaw sculptor, who carved it from a California redwood about 7 feet in diameter. It’s in a community park overlooking the Snake River. To get the full experience, stop by the North West Company Fur Post, re-created at the site of the original 1804 trading post and now a Minnesota State Historical site, just a few miles west. Hope you’ve enjoyed this parade of Minnesota’s roadside voyageurs. There’s another group in Mattawa, Ottawa Canada, but they’ll have to wait for another time....
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#7 voyageur statue: Big Louis in Barnum

Big Louis, the name of the statue in Barnum, is one of the biggest (seems about 40 feet tall) and most elaborate, like his possible brother Big Vic of Ranier. Made of fiberglass, he is also colorful, with a curly black beard and hair and a red-banded tuque hat. He’s dressed in white-striped and long-fringed full-length buckskins, winter wear, belted, not sashed. The long fringes  cover his feet. Big Louis is armed — a pistol tucked in his belt, a musket out front and his power horn in back! His face shows the joie de vivre characteristic of voyageurs — alert to a rival trader moving in to his territory and ready for the challenge. But there’s no paddle. He’s here for good. Big Louis stands sentinel over the Interstate 35 exit #220, checking out the lake on its east side. Next to him is a convenience store, gift shop and café, which are appropriate — voyageurs ran the very first shops in town. Up next: Pine City...
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#6 voyageur statue: Cloquet

Cloquet’s voyageur statue is 25 feet tall, made of fiberglass. He holds the short paddle of a middleman in his canoe. His apparel looks ready for winter — a long double-fringed buckskin tunic, tight leggings and a fur hat. His beard is trimmed and his hair as well. However, he looks gruff, like he misses the good old voyageur companions during the long winter nights. This guy faces inland, with his back to a very calm portion of the St. Louis River. My sister Kris, who led many Girl Scout canoe expeditions, and I are sitting on this guy’s really big feet. The official bronze sign says it was a bicentennial project dedicated July 5, 1976, by Senator Hubert H. Humphrey, Rep. James Oberstar, Floyd D. Jaros, mayor, and Henry C. Larson, chairman. You can find him on Dunlap Island Park, with an old military fort nearby. Drivers will need to figure out which road twists under the bridge. Tomorrow: Big Louis in Barnum...
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